Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 4

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 4 Here we will provide you 1000+ Reading comprehension exercises which will help in coming Reading Comprehension for All Bank Exams,.  So Check all English Reading Comprehension Texts and Exercises,. English reading skills practice.

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 4

PASSAGE 1

After the ―Liberal‖ a new catch-phrase is being coined: ‗A New Health Order‘. Talking about setting it up is the theme of the WHO- sponsored international conference on primary health and medical care, currently being held at Milan in Italy. While much has been said and written on establishing ―new order‖, little has actually been done. Will the conference at Milan too swear by the ―new health order‖, go home and then forget about it, while the present medical and healthcare set-up in poor countries further entrenches itself? This does not have to be the fate of the radical resolutions that will undoubtedly be passed at Milan. Unlike creating a new world economic or information order, establishing a new health set-up is essentially a matter for individual countries to accomplish. No conflict of international interests is involved. But this advantage is, at least until it begins to take concrete shape, only theoretical. The million- dollar question is whether individual third- world governments are able and willing to muster the will, the resources, the administrative and other infrastructure to carry out what it is entirely within their power to attain and implement. The dimensions of the problem are known and the solutions broadly agreed on.

The present medical and health-care system is urban- base, closely geared to drugs, hospitals and expensively trained apathetic doctors. The bulk of the population in poor countries, who live in rural areas, are left untouched by all this and must rely on traditional healers. The answer is to turn out medical/health personnel sufficiently, but not expensively, trained to handle routine complaints and to get villagers to pay adequate attention to cleanliness, hygienic sanitation, garbage disposal and other elementary but crucial matters. More complicated ailments can be referred to properly equipped centres in district towns, cities and metropolises. Traditional healers, whom villagers trust, can be among these intermediate personnel. Some third-world countries, including India, have launched or are preparing elaborate schemes of this nature. But the experience is not quite happy. There is resistance from the medical establishment which sees them as little more than licensed quackery but is to prepared either to offer condensed medical courses such as the former licentiate course available in this country and unwisely scrapped. There is the question of how much importance to give to indigenous system of medicine. And there is the difficult matter of striking the right balance between preventive healthcare and curative medical attention. These are complex issues and the Milan conference would perhaps be more fruitful if it were to discuss such specific subjects.

  1. Theauthor is doubtful whether….

(a) an individual country can set up a a new health order.

(b) the Milan conference would pass radical resolutions.

(c) under-developed countries have the capacity to organize their resources

(d) traditional healers could be trained as intermediate health personnel.

(e) the problem has been understood at all.

 

  1. The author has reservations about the utility of the Milan Conference because…

(a) it is expected only to discuss but not decide upon anything.

(b) earlier conferences had failed to reach any decisions.

(c) the medical profession is opposed to a new health order.

(d) while ―new orders‖ are talked and written about, not much is actually done.

(e) None of these

  1. The contents of the passage indicate that the author is opposed to…

(a) traditional healers.

(b) licentiate practitioners.

(c) all opathic system of medicines.

(d) hospitals.

(e) None of these

  1. Itcan be inferred from the contents of the passage that the author‘s approach is …

(a) sarcastic           (b) constructive

(c) indifferent          (d)fault-finding

(e) hostile

  1. The author thinks that the solution to the problem of medical/health care lies in ….

(a) opening hospitals is rural areas.

(b) conducting inexpensive medical courses.

(c) improving the economic condition of the masses.

(d) expediting the setting up of a new health order.

(e) making cheap drugs available.

  1. To make the conference really useful, the author suggests…

(a) resolving the international conflicts involved.

(b) that it should address itself to specific issues.

(c) it should give importance to indigenous system of medicine.

(d) that it should not pass radical resolutions.

(e) None of these

  1. What does the author suggest for the cure of the cases involving complications?

(a) Treating such cases at well-equipped hospitals in district places

(b) Training such victims in preliminary hygiene

(c) Training semi-skilled doctors to treat such cases

(d) Issuing licences to semi-skilled doctors to treat such cases

(e) None of these

  1. The medical establishment seems to be reluctant to trust the…

(a) all opathic medical practitioners.

(b) traditional healers.

 

(c) urban-based medical practitioners.

(d) expensively trained allopathic doctors.

(e) None of these

  1. Fora new health order, the author recommends all of the following EXCEPT (a) motivating villagers to pay attention to cleanliness

(b) setting up well equipped centres in district towns

(c) discontinuing the present expensive medical courses

(d) training traditional healers to function as medical health personnel

(e) striking a balance between preventive healthcare and curative medical attention

Directions (Q. 10-12): Choose the word which is most nearly the SAME in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. LAUNCHED

(a) participated        (b) accomplished

(c) elevated           (d) planned

(e) started

  1. MUSTER

(a) enlist              (b) summon

(c) manifest           (d) extend

(e) enrich

  1. ENTRENCH

(a) being deteriorating

(b) surround completely

(c) establish firmly

(d) enclose carefully

(e) finish radically

Directions (Q. 13-15): Choose the word which is most nearly OPPOSITE in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. CONDENSED

(a) concentrated                     (b) envigoured

(c) expanded                              (d) lengthened

(e) inexplicable

  1. CRUCIAL

(a) trivial                                         (b) critical

(c) significant                             (d) marvellous

(e) conspicuous

  1. RESISTANCE

(a) opposition                             (b) agreement

(c) repulsion                                (d) acceptance

(e) compliance

PASSAGE 1

  1. (c)2. (d) 3. (e) 4. (b) 5. (b) 6. (b) 7. (a)
  2. (b)9. (c) 10. (e) 11. (a) 12. (c) 13. (d)
  3. (a)15. (d)

 

PASSAGE 2

There is no field of human endeavour that has been so misunderstood as health. While health which connotes well-being and the absence of illness has a low profile, it is illness representing the failure of health which virtually monopolizes attention because of the fear of pain, disability and death. Even Sushruta has warned that this provides the medical practitioner power over the patient which could be misused. Till recently, patients had implicit faith in their physician whom they loved and respected, not only for his knowledge but also in the total belief that practitioners of this noble profession, guided by ethics, always placed the patient‘s interest above all other considerations. This rich interpersonal relationship between the physician, patient and family has, barring a few exceptions, prevailed till the recent past, for caring was considered as important as curing. Our indigenous systems of medicine like ayurveda and yoga have been more concerned with the promotion of the health of both the body and mind and with maintaining a harmonious relationship not just with fellow-beings but with nature itself, of which man is an integral part. Healthy practices like cleanliness, proper diet, exercise and meditation are part of our culture which sustains people even in the prevailing conditions of poverty in rural India and in the unhygienic urban slums. These systems consider disease as an aberration resulting from disturbance of the equilibrium of health, which must be corrected by gentle restoration of this balance through proper diet, medicines and the establishment of mental peace. They also teach the graceful acceptance of old age with its infirmities resulting from the normal degenerative process as well as of death which is inevitable. This is in marked contrast to the western concept of life as a constant struggle against disease, ageing and death which must be fought and conquered with the knowledge and technology derived from their science: a science which, with its narrow dissective and quantifying approach, has provided us the understanding of the microbial causes of communicable diseases and provided highly effective technology for their prevention, treatment and control. This can rightly be claimed as the greatest contribution of western medicine and justifiably termed as ‗high‘ technology. And yet the contribution of this science in the field of non-communicable diseases is remarkably poor despite the far greater inputs in research and treatment for the problems of ageing like cancer, heart diseases, paralytic strokes and arthritis which are the major problems of affluent societies today.

  1. Which of the following has been described as the most outstanding benefits of modern medicine?

 

(A) The real cause and ways of control of communicable diseases

(B) Evolution of the concept of harmony between man and nature

(C) Special techniques for fighting ageing

(a) Only B and C       (b) Only A and B

(c) Only A             (d) Only B

(e) Only C

  1. In India traditionally the doctors were being guided mainly by which of the following?

(a) High technology

(b) Good knowledge

(c) Professional ethics

(d) Power over patient

(e) Western concept of life

  1. What caution have proponents of indigenous systems sounded against medical practitioners?

(a) Their undue concern for the health of the person.

(b) Their emphasis on research on non- communicable diseases.

(c) Their emphasis on curing illness rather than preventive health measures.

(d) Their emphasis on restoring health for affluent members of the society.

(e) None of these

  1. Why has the field of health not been understood properly?

(a) Difficulty in understanding distinction between health and illness.

(b) Confusion between views of indigenous and western system.

(c) Highly advanced technology being used by the professionals.

(d) Not given in the passage.

(e) None of these

  1. Why,according to the author, have people in India survived in spite of poverty?

(a) Their natural resistance to communicable diseases is very high.

(b) They have easy access to western technology.

(c) Their will to conquer diseases

(d) Their harmonious relationship with the physician

(e) None of these

  1. Which of the following pairs are mentioned as ‗contrast‘ in the passage?

(a) Western concept of life and science.

(b) Technology and science.

(c) Western physician and western-educated Indian physician.

(d) Indian and western concepts of life.

(e) Knowledge and technology.

  1. Why does the author describe the contributions of science as remarkably poor?

 

(a) It concentrates more on health than on illness.

(b) It suggests remedies for the poor people.

(c) It demands more inputs in terms of research and technology.

(d) The cost of treatment is low.

(e) None of these

  1. Which of the following can be inferred about the position of the author in writing the passage?

(A) Ardent supporter of western system n present context.

(B) Supremacy of ancient Indian system in today‘s world.

(C) Critical and objective assessment of the present situation.

(a) Only A             (b) Only B

(c) Only C             (d) Neither B nor C

(e) None of these

  1. The author seems to suggest that

(a) we should give importance to improving the health rather than curing of illness.

(b) we should move towards becoming an affluent society.

(c) ayurveda is superior to yoga.

(d) good interpersonal relationship but not sufficient.

(e) ayurvedic medicines can be improved by following western approaches and methods of sciences.

Directions (Q. 10-12): Choose the word which is most OPPOSITE in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. INEVITABLE

(a) Undesirable                         (b) Unsuitable

(c) Detestable                            (d) Avoidable

(e) Available

  1. CONCERNED

(a) Diluted                                    (b) Liberated

(c) Indifferent                            (d) Divested

(e) Relaxed

  1. DEGENERATIVE

(a) Recuperative                      (b) Revolving

(c) Productive                            (d) Innovative

(e) Integrative

Directions (Q. 13-15): Choose the word which is most nearly the SAME in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. CONNOTES

(a) Helps                                         (b) Cures

(c) Follows                                     (d) Confirms

(e) Implies

  1. ABERRATION

(a) Observation                        (b) Alternative

(c) Deviation                               (d) Outcome

(e) Stimulate

  1. DERIVED

 

(a) Constructed        (b) Sprung

(c) Directed           (d) Processed

(e) Continued

 

PASSAGE 2

  1. (c)2. (c) 3. (c) 4. (a) 5. (e) 6. (d) 7. (e)
  2. (b)9. (a) 10. (d) 11. (c) 12. (a) 13. (e)
  3. (c)15. (b)

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 4

 

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 3

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 3 Here we will provide you 1000+ Reading comprehension exercises which will help in coming Reading Comprehension for All Bank Exams,.  So Check all English Reading Comprehension Texts and Exercises,. English reading skills practice.

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 3

PASSAGE 1

In the second week of August 1998, just a few days after the incidents of bombing the US embassies in Nairobi and Dar-es-Salaam, a high-powered, brain-storming session was held near Washington D.C., to discuss various aspects of terrorism. The meeting was attended by ten of America‘s leading experts in various fields such as germ and chemical warfare, public health, disease control and also by the doctors and the law- enforcing officers. Being asked to describe the horror of possible bio-attack, one of the experts narrated the following gloomy scenario. A culprit in a crowded business centre or in a busy shopping mall of a town empties a test tube containing some fluid, which in turn creates an unseen cloud of germ of a dreaded disease like anthrax capable of inflicting a horrible death within 5 days on any one who inhales it. At first 500,  or so victims feel that they have mild influenza which may recede after a day or two. Then the symptoms return again and their lungs start filling with fluid. They rush to local hospitals for treatment, but the panic-stricken people may find that the medicare services run quickly out of drugs due to excessive demand. But no one would be able to realize that a terrorist attack has occurred. One cannot deny the possibility that the germ involved would be of contagious variety capable of causing an epidemic. The meeting concluded that such attacks, apart from causing immediate human tragedy, would have dire long-term effects on the political and social fabric of a country by way of ending people‘s trust on the competence of the government. The experts also said that the bombs used in Kenya and Tanzania were of the old-fashion variety and involved quantities of high explosives, but new terrorism will prove to be more deadly and probably more elusive than hijacking an aeroplane or a gelignite of previous decades. According to Bruce Hoffman, an American specialist on political violence, old terrorism generally had a  specific manifesto-to overthrow a colonial power or the capitalist system and so on.

These terrorists were not shy about planting a bomb or hijacking an aircraft and they set some limit to their brutality. Killing so many innocent people might turn their natural supporters off. Political terrorists want a lot of people watching but not a lot of people dead. ―Old terrorism sought to change the world while the new sort is often practised by those who believe that the world has gone beyond redemption‖, he added. Hoffman says, ―New terrorism has no long- term agenda but is ruthless in its short-term intentions. It is often just a cacophonous cry of protest or an outburst of religious intolerance or a protest against the West in general and the US in particular. Its perpetrators may be religious fanatics or diehard opponent of a government and see no reason to show restraint. They are simply  intent on inflicting the maximum amount of pain on the victim.‖

  1. Inthe context of the passage, the culprit‘s act of emptying a test tube containing some fluid can be classified as

(a) a terrorist attack

(b) an epidemic of a dreaded disease

(c) a natural calamity

(d) panic created by an imaginary event

(e) None of tehse

 

  1. Inwhat way would the new terrorism be different from that of the earlier years?

(A) More dangerous and less baffling

(B) More hazardous for victims

(C) Less complicated for terrorists

(a) A and C only       (b) B and C only

(c) A and B only        (d) All the three

(e) None of these

  1. Whatwas the immediate provocation for the meeting held in August 1998?

(a) the insistence of America‘s leading

(b) the horrors of possible bio-attacks

(c) a culprit‘s heinous act of spreading germs

(d) people‘s lack of trust in the government

(e) None of these

  1. Whatcould be the probable consequence of bio-attacks, as mentioned in the passage?

(A) several deaths

(B) political turmoil

(C) social unrest

(a) A only             (b) B only

(c) C only             (d) A and B only

(e) None of these

  1. Theauthor‘s purpose of writing the above passage seems to explain

(a) the methods of containing terrorism

(b) the socio-political turmoil in African countries

(c) the deadly strategies adopted by modern terrorists

(d) reason for killing innocent people

(e) the salient features of terrorism of

yesteryear

  1. Accordingto the author of the passage, the root cause of terrorism is

(A) religious fanaticism

(B) socio-political changes in countries

(C) the enormous population growth

(a) A only                       (b) B only

(c) C only                       (d) A and B only

(e) All the three

  1. Thephrase ―such attacks‖, as mentioned in the last sentence of the second paragraph, refers to

(a) the onslaught of an epidemic as a natural

(b) bio-attack on political people in the government

(c) attack aimed at damaging the reputation of the government

(d) bio-attack maneuvered by unscrupulous elements

(e) None of these

  1. Thesole objective of the old terrorism, according to Hoffman, was to

(a) plant bombs to kill innocent people

(b) remove colonial power or capitalist system

(c) make people realize the incompetence of the government

(d) give a setback to socio-political order

(e) None of these

  1. Whichof the following statements is true about new terrorism?

(a) Its immediate objectives area quite tragic.

(b) It has far-sighted goals to achieve.

(c) It can differentiate between the innocent people and the guilty.

(d) It is free from any political ideology.

(e) It advocates people in changing the socio-political order

Directions (q. 10-12): choose the word which is most opposite in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage

  1. gloomy

(a) discouraging        (b) disgusting

(c) bright             (d) tragic

(e) versatile

  1. cacophonous

(a) loud              (b) melodious

(c) sonourous          (d) harsh

(e) distant

  1. intolerance

(a) forbearance        (b) permissiveness

(c) adaptability        (d) acceptance

(e) faithfulness

Directions (Q. 13-15): Choose the word which is most nearly the SAME in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. perpetrators

(a) opponents                            (b) followers

(c) sympathizers                      (d) leaders

(e) manoeuvrers

  1. elusive

(a) harmful                                   (b) fatal

(c) destructive                           (d) baffling

(e) obstructing

  1. inflicting

(a) elevating                               (b) imposing

(c) alleviating                             (d) reflecting

(e) soothing

Answer key:

PASSAGE 1

  1. (a)2. (b) 3. (e) 4. (e) 5. (c) 6. (a) 7. (d)
  2. (d)9. (a) 10. (c) 11. (b) 12. (a) 13. (b)
  3. (d)15. (b)

 

PASSAGAE 2

An independent, able and upright judiciary is the hallmark of a free democratic country. Therefore, the process of judicial appointments is of vital importance. At present, on account of the Supreme Court‘s last advisory opinion, the role of the executive and its interference in the appointment of judges is minimal, which, in light of our previous experience, is most welcome. However, there is a strong demand for a National Judicial Commission on the ground of wider participation in the appointment process and for greater transparency. The composition, the role and the procedures of the proposed National Judicial Commission, must be clearly spelt out, lest it be a case of jumping from the frying-pan into the fire. Recently, there has been a lively debate in England on the subject. A judicial commission has been proposed but there are not many takers for that proposal.

In the paper issued this month by the Lord Chancellor‘s Department on judicial appointments, the Lord Chancellor has said, ―I want every vacancy on the Bench to be filled by the best person available. Appointments must and will be made on merit, irrespective of ethnic origin, gender, marital startus, political affiliation, sexual orientation, religion or disability. These are not mere words. They are firm principles. I will not tolerate any form of discrimination.‖ At present, there are hardly any persons from the ethnic minorities manning the higher judiciary and so far not a single woman has made it to the House of Lords. The most significant part of Lord Chancellor‘s paper is the requirement that ―allegations of professional misconduct made in the course of consultations about a candidate for judicial office must be specific and subject to disclosure to the candidate‖. This should go a long way in ensuring that principles of natural justice and fair play are not jettisoned in the appointment process, which is not an uncommon phenomenon.

  1. What,according to the passage should go a long way in judicial appointments?

(a) Decision that all sections of the society are represented.

(b) Candidate‘s qualifications and seniority are considered

(c) Candidate‘s must know the charge of professional misconduct leveled against him.

(d) There should be strong reason for discrimination.

(e) None of these

  1. Accordingto the passage, there has been a demand for a National Judicial Commission to

(a) clear the backing of court cases.

(b) make judiciary see eye to eye with executive.

(c) wipe out corruption at the highest places.

(d) make the appointment process of judges more broad-based and clear.

(e) Safeguard the interest of natural justice and fair play in judicial pronouncement.

  1. Which of the following could be in the author‘s mind when he says ‗in the light of our previous experience‘?

 

(a) Not having enough judges from backward communities.

(b) Interference of the executive in the appointment of judges.

(c) Professional misconduct of judges.

(d) Delay that occurred in the judicial appointments.

(e) None of these

  1. Therole and procedure of the National Commission must be spelt out clearly

(a) because executive wing will depend on it heavily.

(b) because judges will take judicial decisions on the basis of it.

(c) it will be represented by a cross-section of the society.

(d) it will bring a qualitative change in the interpretation of law.

(e) None of these

  1. Whathas been the subject of lively debate in England?

(a) Role of judiciary in free and democratic nations

(b) Appointment of judicial commission

(c) Seniority as the basis of appointment of judges

(d) Appointments of judicial posts

(e) None of these

  1. What,according to the author, is the typical characteristic of an independent democratic country?

(a) Objective process of judicial appointments.

(b) Supreme Court‘s advisory opinion on legal metters.

(c) Responsible, free and fair judiciary.

(d) Lively and frank debate in the society on the role of judiciary.

(e) None of these

  1. Which,according to the passage, is not an uncommon phenomenon?

(a) An independent and upright judiciary

(b) Delays taking place in legal pronouncements

(c) Justice being denied too poor people

(d) Partiality and subjectivity in judicial appointments

(e) None of these

  1. Which of the following words is SIMILAR in meaning as the word jettison as used in the passage?

(a) sacrifice                                  (b) accept

(c) modify                                      (d) destroy

(e) advocate

  1. Whichof the following forms part of what the Lord Chancellor has said?

 

(a) Appointments to judicial posts must take into consideration the aspirations of the weaker sections of the society.

(b) Vacancies in the judiciary must not remain unfilled.

(c) Merit should be the sole criterion for judicial appointments.

(d) Selective discrimination may be preached and also practiced.

(e) None of these

  1. Which of the following according to the author is the most welcome thing?

(a) The negligible role to be played by the executive in the appointments of judges.

(b) Coordinating role played by the executive in the appointment of judges

(c) The appointment of judges from the ethnic minority classes

(d) Appointment of judges purely on the basis of merit

(e) None of these

  1. Which of the following groups of words is SIMILAR in meaning as the word lest as used in the passage?

(a) in spite of          (b) for fear that

(c) for want of         (d) in order to

(e) with regard to

  1. What does the expression ―from the frying-pan into the fire‖ mean?

(a) Seeing one dream after the other

(b) Making plan after plan

(c) Crossing one hurdle after the other

(d) Jumping from one high place to another

(e) None of these

PASSAGE 2

  1. (c)2. (d) 3. (b) 4. (e) 5. (b) 6. (c) 7. (d)
  2. (a)9. (c) 10. (a) 11. (b) 12. (e)

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 3

 

error: