Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 5

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 5  Here we will provide you 1000+ Reading comprehension exercises which will help in coming Reading Comprehension for All Bank Exams,.  So Check all English Reading Comprehension Texts and Exercises,. English reading skills practice.

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 5

PASSAGE 1

We have inherited the tradition of secrecy about the budget from Britain where also the system has been strongly attacked by eminent economists and political scientists including Peter Jay. Sir Richard Clarke, who was the originating genius of nearly every important development in the British budgeting techniques during the last two decades, has spoken out about the abuse of budget secrecy: ―The problems of long-term tax policy should surely be debated openly with the facts on the table.

In my opinion, all governments should have just the same duty to publish their expenditure policy. Indeed, this obligation to public taxation policy is really essential for the control of public expenditure in order to get realistic taxation implications.‖ Realising that democracy flourishes best on the principles of open government, more and more democracies are having an open public debate on budget proposals before introducing the appropriate Bill in the legislature. In the United States the budget is conveyed in a message by the President to the Congress, which comes well in advance of the date when the Bill is introduced in the Congress. In Finland the Parliament and the people are already discussing in June the tentative budget proposals which are to be introduced in the Finnish Parliament in September.

Every budget contains a cartload of figures in black and white-but the dark figures represent the myriad lights and shades of India‘s life, the contrasting tones of poverty and wealth, and of bread so dear and flesh and blood so cheap, the deep tints of adventure and enterprise and man‘s ageless struggle for a brighter morning. The Union budget should not be an annual scourge but a part of presentation of annual accounts of a partnership between the Government and the people. That partnership would work much better when  the nonsensical secrecy is replaced by openness and public consultations, resulting in fair laws and the people‘s acceptance of their moral duty to pay.

  1. How do the British economists and political scientists react to budget secrecy? They are

(a) in favour of having a mix of secrecy and openness.

(b) indifferent to the budgeting techniques and taxation policies.

(c) very critical about maintenance of budget secrecy.

(d) advocates of not disclosing in advance the budget contents.

(e) None of these

  1. The author thinks that openness in budget is essential as it leads to

(a) prevention of tax implications

(b) People‘s reluctance to accept their moral duties

(c) exaggerated revelation of the strengths and weaknesses of economy

(d) making our country on par with Finland

(e) None of these

  1. The author seems to be in favour of (a) maintaining secrecy of budget

(b) judicious blend of secrecy and openness

(c) transparency in budget proposals

(d) replacement of public constitution by secrecy

(e) None of these

  1. The secrecy of the budget is maintained by all of the following countries except

(A) Finland

(B) India

(C) United States

(a) Only A                                      (b) Only B

(c) Only C                                      (d) A and C

(e) B and C

  1. Which of the following statements is definitely TRUE in the context of the passage?

(a) The British Government has been religiously maintaining budget secrecy.

(b) Budget secrecy is likely to lead to corrupt practices.

(c) Consulting unjustifiable taxes with public helps make them accept those taxes.

(d) There should be no control on public expenditure in democratic condition.

(e) None of these

  1. SirRichard Clarke seems to deserve the credit for

(a) transformation in the British budgetary techniques.

(b) Maintenance of secrecy of the British budget.

(c) detection of abuse of transparency in budget.

 

(d) bringing down the tax load on British people.

(e) None of these

  1. Fromthe contents of the passage, it can be inferred that the author is

(a) authoritarian in his approach.

(b) a democratic person.

(c) unaware of India‘s recent economic developments

(d) a conservative person.

(e) None of these

  1. Whichof the following statement(s) is/are definitely False in the context of the passage?

(A) Transparency helps unscrupulous elements to resort to corrupt practices.

(B) Open approach of Government is a sign of healthy democracy.

(C) People‘s acceptance of their moral duties can best be achieved through openness and public consultations.

(a) Only A             (b) Only B

(c) Only C             (d) A and B

(e) B and C

  1. For making the budget realistic, the Government should

(a) refrain from making public the proposed provisions before finalization.

(b) discuss it secretly within themselves.

(c) encourage the public to send in their suggestions.

(d) consult the public to send in their suggestions.

(e) None of these

Directions (Q. 10-12): Choose the word which is most nearly the SAME in meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. SCOURGE

(a) ritual                                          (b) presentation

(c) whip                                           (d) compromise

(e) remedy

  1. MYRIAD

(a) adequate                               (b) functional

(c) incompatible                       (d) abundant

(e) excellent

  1. DUTY

(a) obligation                              (b) imposition

(c) tax-liability                           (d) function

(e) job

Directions (Q. 13-15): Choose the word which is most OPPOSITE in meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. FLOURISHES

(a) disappears                            (b) degenerates

(c) vanishes                                 (d) blooms

(e) opens

  1. DEBATED

 

(a) questioned severely

(b) opposed strongly

(c) accepted unconditionally

(d) discussed frankly

(e) implemented forcibly

  1. IMPORTANT

(a) major             (b) uncountable

(c) significant          (d) unscheduled

(e) trivial

PASSAGE 1

  1. (c)2. (e) 3. (b) 4. (d) 5. (e) 6. (a) 7. (b)

  2. (a)9. (d) 10. (c) 11. (d) 12. (a) 13. (b)

  3. (c)15. (e)

 

PASSAGE 2

In a disarmingly frank talk at the Indian Merchants Chamber in Mumbai, the Japanese Ambassador in India dwelt at length on issues that exercise the minds of Japanese investors when they consider investment proposals in India. Raising the question ―What comparative advantages does India offer as an investment market?‖, he said though labour in India is inexpensive, wage levels are offset by productivity level to a large extent. Acknowledging that the vastness of the Indian market is a great inducement for investment in manufacturing industry, he wondered if it was justifiable to provide that overseas remittance of profit in foreign exchange be fully covered by exchange earnings as had been done. Significantly, on the eve of the Prime Minister‘s visit to Japan, the government delinked profits repatriation from exports, meeting this demand. The Ambassador said foreign investors needed to be assured of the continuity and consistency of the liberalisation policy and the fact that new measures had been put into force by means of administrative notifications without amending government laws acted as a damper. The Ambassador pleaded for speedy formulation of the exit policy and pointed to the highly restrictive control by the government on disinvestment by foreign partners in joint ventures in India. While it is all too easy to dismiss critical comment on  conditions in India contemptuously, there can be little doubt that if foreign investment is to be wooed assiduously, we will have to meet exacting international standards and cater at least partially to what we may consider the idiosyncrasies of our foreign collaborators. The Japanese too have passed through a stage in the fifties when their products were derided as sub-standard and shoddy. That they have come out of that ordeal of fire to emerge as an economic superpower speakes as much of their doggedness to pursue goals against all odds as of their ability to improvise and adapt to internationally acceptable standards. There is no gainsaying that the past record Japanese investment is a poor benchmark for future expectations.

  1. The author has appreciated the Japanese for their

(a) quality of products manufactured in the fifties.

(b) passing through an ordeal.

(c) perseverance in raising quality of products.

(d) future expectations.

(e) None of these

  1. According to the Japanese Ambassador, which of the following motivates the foreign investors to invest in Indian manufacturing industry?

(a) very large scope of Indian market

(b) overseas remittance of profit in foreign exchange

(c) assurance of continuity of the liberalization policy

(d) high productivity levels

(e) None of these

  1. The purpose of the author in writing this passage seems to be to

(a) discourage foreign investment in India.

(b) critically examine Indian investment environment.

(c) paint a rosy picture of India‘s trade and commerce.

(d) criticize government‘s liberalization policy.

(e) raise the expectations of foreign investors.

  1. Which of the following suggestions were expected by the Japanese Ambassador?

(A) speedy formulation of the exit policy

(B) imposing restrictions of disinvestment by foreign partners in joint ventures in India

(C) continuity and consistency of the liberalization policy

(a) All the three                        (b) A and B only

(c) B and C only                       (d) A and C only

(e) None of these

  1. According to the Japanese Ambassador, India offers a comparative advantage to foreign investors in terms of

(a) inexpensive labour

(b) abysmally low wage levels

(c) higher productivity

(d) skilled workforce

(e) None of these

  1. Forseeking more and more foreign investment, the author suggests that we should

(a) satisfy fully the whims of our foreign collaborators.

(b) dismiss all critical comments on Indian conditions.

(c) link profit repatriations to exports.

 

(d) raise the quality of product to match international standards.

(e) None of these

  1. From the passage it can be inferred that the author is

(a) a political commentator.

(b) a secretary of the Japanese Ambassador.

(c) a Japanese investor.

(d) an Indian investor.

(e) None of these

  1. The author attributes Japan‘s emergence as an economic superpower to

(A) their ability to overcome any ordeal.

(B) their tenacity and perseverance despite unfavourable circumstances.

(C) their ability to improvise and adapt to globally acceptable quality levels.

(a) A and B only  (b) B and C only

(c) A and C only  (d) All the three

(e) None of these

  1. Whichof the following statement(s) is/are true about the critical comments on investment conditions in India?

(A) These comments are difficult to be countered.

(B) These comments are received from various international quarters.

(C) These comments are based more on biases than on facts.

(a) Only C            (b) Only B

(c) Only A                                      (d) A and B only

(e) A and C only

Directions (Q. 10-12): Choose the word which is most SAME in meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. ASSIDUOSLY

(a) persistently                         (b) hastly

(c) feebly                                        (d) deliberately

(e) innocently

  1. IDIOSYNCRASIES

(a) demands                               (b) needs

(c) deviations                             (d) ideologies

(e) identity

  1. SHODDY

(a) extraordinary     (b) shabby

(c) cheap                        (d) disadvantageous

(e) unprofitable

Directions (Q. 13-15): Choose the word which is most OPPOSITE in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. INDUCEMENT

(a) incentive                                (b) motive

(c) breach                                      (d) temptation

(e) impediment

  1. JUSTIFIABLE

(a) unreasonable                     (b) formidable

(c) irrecoverable                       (d) unscrupulous

 

(e) inevitable

  1. CONTEMPTUOUSLY

(a) amicably           (b) reasonably

(c) respectfully         (d) methodically

(e) indecisively

 

PASSAGE 2

  1. (c)2. (a) 3. (b) 4. (a) 5. (e) 6. (d) 7. (a)

  2. (d)9. (b) 10. (d) 11. (d) 12. (c) 13. (e)

  3. (d)15. (c)

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 5

 

Comments

comments

Leave a Comment

error: