Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 4

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 4 Here we will provide you 1000+ Reading comprehension exercises which will help in coming Reading Comprehension for All Bank Exams,.  So Check all English Reading Comprehension Texts and Exercises,. English reading skills practice.

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 4

PASSAGE 1

After the ―Liberal‖ a new catch-phrase is being coined: ‗A New Health Order‘. Talking about setting it up is the theme of the WHO- sponsored international conference on primary health and medical care, currently being held at Milan in Italy. While much has been said and written on establishing ―new order‖, little has actually been done. Will the conference at Milan too swear by the ―new health order‖, go home and then forget about it, while the present medical and healthcare set-up in poor countries further entrenches itself? This does not have to be the fate of the radical resolutions that will undoubtedly be passed at Milan. Unlike creating a new world economic or information order, establishing a new health set-up is essentially a matter for individual countries to accomplish. No conflict of international interests is involved. But this advantage is, at least until it begins to take concrete shape, only theoretical. The million- dollar question is whether individual third- world governments are able and willing to muster the will, the resources, the administrative and other infrastructure to carry out what it is entirely within their power to attain and implement. The dimensions of the problem are known and the solutions broadly agreed on.

The present medical and health-care system is urban- base, closely geared to drugs, hospitals and expensively trained apathetic doctors. The bulk of the population in poor countries, who live in rural areas, are left untouched by all this and must rely on traditional healers. The answer is to turn out medical/health personnel sufficiently, but not expensively, trained to handle routine complaints and to get villagers to pay adequate attention to cleanliness, hygienic sanitation, garbage disposal and other elementary but crucial matters. More complicated ailments can be referred to properly equipped centres in district towns, cities and metropolises. Traditional healers, whom villagers trust, can be among these intermediate personnel. Some third-world countries, including India, have launched or are preparing elaborate schemes of this nature. But the experience is not quite happy. There is resistance from the medical establishment which sees them as little more than licensed quackery but is to prepared either to offer condensed medical courses such as the former licentiate course available in this country and unwisely scrapped. There is the question of how much importance to give to indigenous system of medicine. And there is the difficult matter of striking the right balance between preventive healthcare and curative medical attention. These are complex issues and the Milan conference would perhaps be more fruitful if it were to discuss such specific subjects.

  1. Theauthor is doubtful whether….

(a) an individual country can set up a a new health order.

(b) the Milan conference would pass radical resolutions.

(c) under-developed countries have the capacity to organize their resources

(d) traditional healers could be trained as intermediate health personnel.

(e) the problem has been understood at all.

 

  1. The author has reservations about the utility of the Milan Conference because…

(a) it is expected only to discuss but not decide upon anything.

(b) earlier conferences had failed to reach any decisions.

(c) the medical profession is opposed to a new health order.

(d) while ―new orders‖ are talked and written about, not much is actually done.

(e) None of these

  1. The contents of the passage indicate that the author is opposed to…

(a) traditional healers.

(b) licentiate practitioners.

(c) all opathic system of medicines.

(d) hospitals.

(e) None of these

  1. Itcan be inferred from the contents of the passage that the author‘s approach is …

(a) sarcastic           (b) constructive

(c) indifferent          (d)fault-finding

(e) hostile

  1. The author thinks that the solution to the problem of medical/health care lies in ….

(a) opening hospitals is rural areas.

(b) conducting inexpensive medical courses.

(c) improving the economic condition of the masses.

(d) expediting the setting up of a new health order.

(e) making cheap drugs available.

  1. To make the conference really useful, the author suggests…

(a) resolving the international conflicts involved.

(b) that it should address itself to specific issues.

(c) it should give importance to indigenous system of medicine.

(d) that it should not pass radical resolutions.

(e) None of these

  1. What does the author suggest for the cure of the cases involving complications?

(a) Treating such cases at well-equipped hospitals in district places

(b) Training such victims in preliminary hygiene

(c) Training semi-skilled doctors to treat such cases

(d) Issuing licences to semi-skilled doctors to treat such cases

(e) None of these

  1. The medical establishment seems to be reluctant to trust the…

(a) all opathic medical practitioners.

(b) traditional healers.

 

(c) urban-based medical practitioners.

(d) expensively trained allopathic doctors.

(e) None of these

  1. Fora new health order, the author recommends all of the following EXCEPT (a) motivating villagers to pay attention to cleanliness

(b) setting up well equipped centres in district towns

(c) discontinuing the present expensive medical courses

(d) training traditional healers to function as medical health personnel

(e) striking a balance between preventive healthcare and curative medical attention

Directions (Q. 10-12): Choose the word which is most nearly the SAME in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. LAUNCHED

(a) participated        (b) accomplished

(c) elevated           (d) planned

(e) started

  1. MUSTER

(a) enlist              (b) summon

(c) manifest           (d) extend

(e) enrich

  1. ENTRENCH

(a) being deteriorating

(b) surround completely

(c) establish firmly

(d) enclose carefully

(e) finish radically

Directions (Q. 13-15): Choose the word which is most nearly OPPOSITE in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. CONDENSED

(a) concentrated                     (b) envigoured

(c) expanded                              (d) lengthened

(e) inexplicable

  1. CRUCIAL

(a) trivial                                         (b) critical

(c) significant                             (d) marvellous

(e) conspicuous

  1. RESISTANCE

(a) opposition                             (b) agreement

(c) repulsion                                (d) acceptance

(e) compliance

PASSAGE 1

  1. (c)2. (d) 3. (e) 4. (b) 5. (b) 6. (b) 7. (a)
  2. (b)9. (c) 10. (e) 11. (a) 12. (c) 13. (d)
  3. (a)15. (d)

 

PASSAGE 2

There is no field of human endeavour that has been so misunderstood as health. While health which connotes well-being and the absence of illness has a low profile, it is illness representing the failure of health which virtually monopolizes attention because of the fear of pain, disability and death. Even Sushruta has warned that this provides the medical practitioner power over the patient which could be misused. Till recently, patients had implicit faith in their physician whom they loved and respected, not only for his knowledge but also in the total belief that practitioners of this noble profession, guided by ethics, always placed the patient‘s interest above all other considerations. This rich interpersonal relationship between the physician, patient and family has, barring a few exceptions, prevailed till the recent past, for caring was considered as important as curing. Our indigenous systems of medicine like ayurveda and yoga have been more concerned with the promotion of the health of both the body and mind and with maintaining a harmonious relationship not just with fellow-beings but with nature itself, of which man is an integral part. Healthy practices like cleanliness, proper diet, exercise and meditation are part of our culture which sustains people even in the prevailing conditions of poverty in rural India and in the unhygienic urban slums. These systems consider disease as an aberration resulting from disturbance of the equilibrium of health, which must be corrected by gentle restoration of this balance through proper diet, medicines and the establishment of mental peace. They also teach the graceful acceptance of old age with its infirmities resulting from the normal degenerative process as well as of death which is inevitable. This is in marked contrast to the western concept of life as a constant struggle against disease, ageing and death which must be fought and conquered with the knowledge and technology derived from their science: a science which, with its narrow dissective and quantifying approach, has provided us the understanding of the microbial causes of communicable diseases and provided highly effective technology for their prevention, treatment and control. This can rightly be claimed as the greatest contribution of western medicine and justifiably termed as ‗high‘ technology. And yet the contribution of this science in the field of non-communicable diseases is remarkably poor despite the far greater inputs in research and treatment for the problems of ageing like cancer, heart diseases, paralytic strokes and arthritis which are the major problems of affluent societies today.

  1. Which of the following has been described as the most outstanding benefits of modern medicine?

 

(A) The real cause and ways of control of communicable diseases

(B) Evolution of the concept of harmony between man and nature

(C) Special techniques for fighting ageing

(a) Only B and C       (b) Only A and B

(c) Only A             (d) Only B

(e) Only C

  1. In India traditionally the doctors were being guided mainly by which of the following?

(a) High technology

(b) Good knowledge

(c) Professional ethics

(d) Power over patient

(e) Western concept of life

  1. What caution have proponents of indigenous systems sounded against medical practitioners?

(a) Their undue concern for the health of the person.

(b) Their emphasis on research on non- communicable diseases.

(c) Their emphasis on curing illness rather than preventive health measures.

(d) Their emphasis on restoring health for affluent members of the society.

(e) None of these

  1. Why has the field of health not been understood properly?

(a) Difficulty in understanding distinction between health and illness.

(b) Confusion between views of indigenous and western system.

(c) Highly advanced technology being used by the professionals.

(d) Not given in the passage.

(e) None of these

  1. Why,according to the author, have people in India survived in spite of poverty?

(a) Their natural resistance to communicable diseases is very high.

(b) They have easy access to western technology.

(c) Their will to conquer diseases

(d) Their harmonious relationship with the physician

(e) None of these

  1. Which of the following pairs are mentioned as ‗contrast‘ in the passage?

(a) Western concept of life and science.

(b) Technology and science.

(c) Western physician and western-educated Indian physician.

(d) Indian and western concepts of life.

(e) Knowledge and technology.

  1. Why does the author describe the contributions of science as remarkably poor?

 

(a) It concentrates more on health than on illness.

(b) It suggests remedies for the poor people.

(c) It demands more inputs in terms of research and technology.

(d) The cost of treatment is low.

(e) None of these

  1. Which of the following can be inferred about the position of the author in writing the passage?

(A) Ardent supporter of western system n present context.

(B) Supremacy of ancient Indian system in today‘s world.

(C) Critical and objective assessment of the present situation.

(a) Only A             (b) Only B

(c) Only C             (d) Neither B nor C

(e) None of these

  1. The author seems to suggest that

(a) we should give importance to improving the health rather than curing of illness.

(b) we should move towards becoming an affluent society.

(c) ayurveda is superior to yoga.

(d) good interpersonal relationship but not sufficient.

(e) ayurvedic medicines can be improved by following western approaches and methods of sciences.

Directions (Q. 10-12): Choose the word which is most OPPOSITE in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. INEVITABLE

(a) Undesirable                         (b) Unsuitable

(c) Detestable                            (d) Avoidable

(e) Available

  1. CONCERNED

(a) Diluted                                    (b) Liberated

(c) Indifferent                            (d) Divested

(e) Relaxed

  1. DEGENERATIVE

(a) Recuperative                      (b) Revolving

(c) Productive                            (d) Innovative

(e) Integrative

Directions (Q. 13-15): Choose the word which is most nearly the SAME in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

  1. CONNOTES

(a) Helps                                         (b) Cures

(c) Follows                                     (d) Confirms

(e) Implies

  1. ABERRATION

(a) Observation                        (b) Alternative

(c) Deviation                               (d) Outcome

(e) Stimulate

  1. DERIVED

 

(a) Constructed        (b) Sprung

(c) Directed           (d) Processed

(e) Continued

 

PASSAGE 2

  1. (c)2. (c) 3. (c) 4. (a) 5. (e) 6. (d) 7. (e)
  2. (b)9. (a) 10. (d) 11. (c) 12. (a) 13. (e)
  3. (c)15. (b)

Reading Comprehension English For Bank Test Series 4

 

Comments

comments

Leave a Comment

error: